Democracy in Zimbabwe is on life support

If there was any lingering hope that the run off elections in Zimbabwe would fairly confirm the result of the first set of elections, then a story being reported by the media over there may well have extinguished it.

The Sydney Morning Herald is reporting that veterans of the liberation war of the 1970s would rather take up arms and use violence to ensure that the country remained in Mugabe’s control rather than let the people democratically elect the opposition, led by Morgan Tsvangirai.

Hardly anything is being done outside of the country to place pressure on Mugabe and his regime to wake up to themselves besides economic threats and sanctions. If the United Nations doesn’t show some backbone and intervene somehow, I fear that the 27 June runoff will end up in tragic bloodshed as opposed to a just and democratic transition of government

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4 Responses

  1. Mugabe’s regime poses no discernible threat to the US; why should we intervene?

  2. This isn’t about the self-interest of other nations – more about promoting the virtues of democracy and helping ensure that a nation which has all but collapsed because of its’ government’s heavy handedness can have a chance to survive. Intervention doesn’t have to mean that you invade the country like what happened with Iraq, but to allow diplomacy to be at the forefront as oppsed to unnecessary bloodshed.

    My point mainly revolves around the UN Security Council, not the responses of individual legislatures. However your country seems to be doing an exemplary job in terms of sanctioning.

  3. LOL United Nations intervention devolves into US intervention because the US is the strong arm of the UN.

    As far as sanctions go, their normally ineffective when the regime in power doesn’t particularly care about the wellbeing of its subjects – Iraq was a good case in point as example.

    Mugabe isn’t even really running the show; his generals are now effectively setting policy these days – at least as far as the elections are concerned.

    Like most politics in sub-Saharan Africa, there is little likelihood of a nonviolent resolution.

  4. “LOL United Nations intervention devolves into US intervention because the US is the strong arm of the UN.

    As far as sanctions go, their normally ineffective when the regime in power doesn’t particularly care about the wellbeing of its subjects – Iraq was a good case in point as example.”

    Good points – and all the more reason to say “Good on the yanks” for having both the ability and the guts to do something. I hope the world can combine to do something about Zimbabwe and Darfur etc without the US having to go it alone or worse still, not do anything. Like them or not, and despite their mistakes, the world is a better place with America playing the policeman. The alternatives would be horrifying. Lack of war is not peace.

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